Saturday, January 01, 2005

Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential

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Garbuzova-Davis S, Willing AE, Zigova T, Saporta S, Justen EB, Lane JC, Hudson JE, Chen N, Davis CD, Sanberg PR. Intravenous administration of human umbilical cord blood cells in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: distribution, migration, and differentiation. J Hematother Stem Cell Res. 2003 Jun;12(3):255-70. Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair and Department of Neurosurgery, University of South Florida, College of Medicine, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a multifactorial disease characterized by diffuse motor neuron degeneration, has proven to be a difficult target for stem cell therapy. The primary aim of this study was to determine the long-term effects of intravenous mononuclear human umbilical cord blood cells on disease progression in a well-defined mouse model of ALS. In addition, we rigorously examined the distribution of transplanted cells inside and outside the central nervous system (CNS), migration of transplanted cells to degenerating areas in the brain and spinal cord, and their immunophenotype. Human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) cells (10(6)) were delivered intravenously into presymptomatic G93A mice. The major findings in our study were that cord blood transfusion into the systemic circulation of G93A mice delayed disease progression at least 2-3 weeks and increased lifespan of diseased mice. In addition, transplanted cells survived 10-12 weeks after infusion while they entered regions of motor neuron degeneration in the brain and spinal cord. There, the cells migrated into the parenchyma of the brain and spinal cord and expressed neural markers [Nestin, III Beta-Tubulin (TuJ1), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)]. Infused cord blood cells were also widely distributed in peripheral organs, mainly the spleen. Transplanted cells also were recovered in the peripheral circulation, possibly providing an additional cell supply. Our results indicate that cord blood may have therapeutic potential in this noninvasive cell-based treatment of ALS by providing cell replacement and protection of motor neurons. Replacement of damaged neurons by progeny of cord blood stem cells is probably not the only mechanism by which hUCB exert their effect, since low numbers of cells expressed neural antigens. Most likely, cord blood efficacy is partially due to neuroprotection by modulation of the autoimmune process.

Chen R, Ende N. The potential for the use of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in SOD1 mice. J Med. 2000;31(1-2):21-30. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, New Jersey School of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry, Newark 07103, USA. The SOD1 mice (transgenic B6SJL-TgN(SOD1-G93A)1GUR) have a mutation of the human transgene (CuZn superoxide dismutase gene SOD1) that has been associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In a preliminary study, we demonstrated that a megadose of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells given intravenously after 800 cGy of irradiation could substantially increase the life span of SOD1 mice. This report is an attempt to confirm and expand the preliminary findings. By repeating the study and raising the number of human cord blood cells from 33.2-34.0 x 10(6) to 70.2-73.3 x 10(6) there was a further significant increase in the life span of the SOD1 mice. The average life of the controls was 123.5 days while that of mice receiving the larger megadose of cells was 162 days. While all the controls were dead by 130 days, the treated group receiving 70.2-73.3 x 10(6) cells had one animal living up to 187 days and one 210 days. In order to obtain a megadose of cells, pooled blood from different donors was used and did not appear to have a negative effect, but indicated a beneficial effect on survival. The clinical significance of these findings may extend beyond the potential treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This study confirms and extends the preliminary study whereby increasing the dose of human umbilical cord blood cells we were able to substantially further increase the survival of SOD1 mice.

Ende N, Weinstein F, Chen R, Ende M. Human umbilical cord blood effect on sod mice (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Life Sci. 2000 May 26;67(1):53-9. In previous studies we observed that human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) could have a protective effect on the onset of disease and time of death in MRL Lpr/Lpr mice which have an autoimmune disease that may be considered similar to human lupus. We believed a temporary xenograph may have occurred in these animals with the disease process delayed and the life span markedly increased. When HUCB is stored at 4 degrees C in gas permeable bags, there is a decrease of the cell reaction in mixed lymphocyte cultures. The blood, however, maintains a significant number of cells capable of producing replatable colonies. This study attempted to determine the effect of HUCB on SOD1 mice (transgenic B6SJL-TgN(SOD1-G93A)1GUR), which have a mutation of the human transgene, (CuZn superoxide dismutase gene SOD1) that has been associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We previously developed evidence that the survival of lethally irradiated mice was related to the number of human mononuclear cells administered. In the present study, we decided to investigate the effect of a relatively large dose of human mononuclear cord blood cells on SOD1 mice subjected to a sublethal dose of irradiation preceded by antikiller sera (rabbit anti-asialo). The SOD1 mice show evidence of paralysis at 4 to 5 months. The average expected lifetime of these mice is reported to be 130 days (Jackson Laboratory). In this experiment, there were 23 mice. Two mice died before the onset of paralysis. The remainder were divided into three groups: group I: control group of 4 untreated mice; group II: an experimental group of 6 mice treated with antikiller sera, 800 cGy irradiation plus 5 x 10(6) congenic bone marrow mononuclear cells; group III: another experimental group of 11 mice treated with antikiller sera, 800 cGy irradiation plus 34.2-35.6 x 10(6) HUCB mononuclear cells, previously stored for 17-20 days at 4 degrees C in gas permeable bags. The results were as follows: the average age at death was: (I) 127 days for the untreated control group, (II) 138 days for the group that received 800 cGy of irradiation and congenic bone marrow (BM) and (III) 148 days for the group that received irradiation and HUCB. (P <>Central nervous system entry of peripherally injected umbilical cord blood cells is not required for neuroprotection in stroke. Stroke. 2004 Oct;35(10):2385-9. Epub 2004 Sep 02. Department of Neurology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912-3200, USA. cborlongan@mail.mcg.edu AND PURPOSE: To date, stem cell graft-mediated neuroprotection is equated with graft survival and secretion of neurotrophic factors in the brain. Here, we examined whether neuroprotection by systemically delivered human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) cells was dependent on their entry into the central nervous system in a rodent model of acute stroke. METHODS: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to right middle cerebral artery occlusion for 60 minutes. During the 1-hour occlusion, animals were randomly assigned to 1 of the following treatments: intravenous injection of HUCB (a subtherapeutic dose of 200,000 cells in 10 microL) with blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeabilizer (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4 degrees C) or vehicle, intravenous vehicle alone, or intravenous mannitol alone. Behavioral tests, using elevated body swing test and passive avoidance test, were conducted at day 3 poststroke, and thereafter, animals were euthanized for: (1) immunohistochemical examination of HUCB, which were lentivirally labeled with green fluorescent protein; (2) cerebral infarction analysis using 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride; and (3) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of trophic factors within the striatal region. RESULTS: We did not detect intravenously administered low dose of HUCB cells in the brains of animals at day 3 after stroke even when cells were coinfused with a BBB permeabilizer (mannitol). However, HUCB-mannitol treatment significantly increased brain levels of neurotrophic factors, which correlated positively with reduced cerebral infarcts and improved behavioral functions. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that central nervous system availability of grafted cells is not a prerequisite for acute neuroprotection provided that therapeutic molecules secreted by these cells could cross the BBB.

Vendrame M, Cassady J, Newcomb J, Butler T, Pennypacker KR, Zigova T, Sanberg CD, Sanberg PR, Willing AE. Infusion of human umbilical cord blood cells in a rat model of stroke dose-dependently rescues behavioral deficits and reduces infarct volume. Stroke. 2004 Oct;35(10):2390-5. Epub 2004 Aug 19. BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intravenously delivered human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBC) have been previously shown to improve functional recovery of stroked rats. To extend these findings, we examined the behavioral recovery and stroke infarct volume in the presence of increasing doses of HUCBC after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). METHODS: Rats were subjected to MCAO and allowed to recover for 24 hours before intravenous infusion of 10(4) up to 3 to 5x10(7) HUCBC. Behavioral tests (spontaneous activity, step test, elevated body swing test) were performed 1 week before MCAO and at 2 and 4 weeks after HUCBC infusion. On completion of behavioral testing, animals were euthanized and brain infarct volumes quantified. HUCBC were identified by immunofluorescence for human nuclei and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for human glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. RESULTS: At 4 weeks after infusion, there was a significant recovery in behavioral performance when 10(6) or more HUCBC were delivered (p=0.001 to p=0.05). Infarct volume measurements revealed an inverse relationship between HUCBC dose and damage volume, which reached significance at the higher HUCBC doses (10(7) cells, p<0.01;>
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A. Taguchi, Administration of CD34+ cells after stroke enhances neurogenesis via angiogenesis in a mouse model. J Clin Invest. 2004 Aug;114(3):330-8. Department of Cerebrovascular Disease, National Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, Japan. ataguchi@res.ncvc.go.jp Thrombo-occlusive cerebrovascular disease resulting in stroke and permanent neuronal loss is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Because of the unique properties of cerebral vasculature and the limited reparative capability of neuronal tissue, it has been difficult to devise effective neuroprotective therapies in cerebral ischemia. Our results demonstrate that systemic administration of human cord blood-derived CD34(+) cells to immunocompromised mice subjected to stroke 48 hours earlier induces neovascularization in the ischemic zone and provides a favorable environment for neuronal regeneration. Endogenous neurogenesis, suppressed by an antiangiogenic agent, is accelerated as a result of enhanced migration of neuronal progenitor cells to the damaged area, followed by their maturation and functional recovery. Our data suggest an essential role for CD34(+) cells in promoting directly or indirectly an environment conducive to neovascularization of ischemic brain so that neuronal regeneration can proceed.

Peterson DA. Umbilical cord blood cells and brain stroke injury: bringing in fresh blood to address an old problem. J Clin Invest. 2004 Aug;114(3):312-4. Department of Neuroscience, The Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, Illinois 60064, USA. daniel.peterson@rosalindfranklin.edu Degeneration of brain tissue following stroke leads to functional impairment with limited brain self-repair. New evidence suggests that delivery of circulating CD34(+) human umbilical cord blood cells can produce functional recovery in an animal stroke model with concurrent angiogenesis and neurogenesis leading to some restoration of cortical tissue. While some alternative interpretations of this data are offered herein, the study provides encouraging evidence of functional recovery from stroke in an animal model using stem cell therapy. [commentary on previous study]

Willing AE, Lixian J, Milliken M, Poulos S, Zigova T, Song S, Hart C, Sanchez-Ramos J, Sanberg PR. Intravenous versus intrastriatal cord blood administration in a rodent model of stroke. J Neurosci Res. 2003 Aug 1;73(3):296-307. Human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) is a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells that have been used to reconstitute immune cells and blood lineages. Cells from another hematopoietic source, bone marrow, have been found to differentiate into neural cells and are effective in the treatment of stroke. In this study, we administered hUCB cells intravenously into the femoral vein or directly into the striatum and assessed which route of cell administration produced the greatest behavioral recovery in rats with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). All animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporine (CSA). When spontaneous activity was measured using the Digiscan automated system, it was found to be significantly less when hUCB was transplanted 24 hr after stroke compared with nontransplanted, stroked animals (P <>Parkinson's disease mice and human umbilical cord blood. J Med. 2002;33(1-4):173-80. In 1995, it was suggested that immature stem cells (Berashis Cells) existing in human cord blood might have an ameliorating effect on such neurological diseases as Alzheimer's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. Since these predictions, we have been able to successfully extend the length of life of mice with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [B6SJL-TgN(SOD1-G93A)IGUR], Huntington's Disease (B6CBA-TgN(H.Dexon1)62Gpb and Alzheimer's mice [Tg(HuAPP695.SWE)2576]. Recently we expanded the studies to include mice with Parkinson's Disease. 32 mice, 6-12 weeks old B6CBACa-AW-J/A-Kcnj6 were obtained from Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine. The mice were divided into 3 groups: (A) 10 untreated control mice, (B) 10 mice treated with 5.6 x 10(6) congenic bone marrow mononuclear cells and (C) 12 mice receiving 100-110 x 10(6) HUCB mononuclear cells intravenously. No immunosuppression was used. When 50% of the controls were dead only 1 of the 10 mice receiving congenic marrow and 2 out of 12 mice that received cord blood mononuclear cells were dead. This preliminary study was terminated when the animal's were 200 days old, at that time one out of 10 controls was alive. Out of 10 mice that received congenic bone marrow, 2 were alive. Out of 12 mice that received megadoses of cord blood mononuclear cells 4 were alive. Survival curve of mice that had congenic marrow had a p value of <.05; the survival curve of mice receiving cord blood mononuclear cells had a p value <.001 (Fig 1) compared to controls. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells significantly delayed the onset of symptoms and death of Parkinson's disease mice. This effect was greater than that produced by congenic bone marrow cells. __________________________________________________________________
Saporta S, Kim JJ, Willing AE, Fu ES, Davis CD, Sanberg PR. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells infusion in spinal cord injury: engraftment and beneficial influence on behavior. J Hematother Stem Cell Res. 2003 Jun;12(3):271-8. The use of human umbilical cord blood (hUCB)--a rich source of nonembryonic or adult stem cells--has recently been reported to ameliorate behavioral consequences of stroke. In this study, we tested whether human cord blood leukocytes also ameliorate behavioral impairments of spinal cord injury. Rats were divided into five groups: (1) laminectomy (without spinal cord injury) only; (2) laminectomy + cord blood infusion; (3) spinal cord injury + cord blood infused 1 day post injury; (4) spinal cord injury + cord blood infused 5 days post injury; and (5) spinal cord injury only. Spinal cord injury was induced by compressing the spinal cord for 1 min with an aneurysm clip calibrated to a closing pressure of 55 g. Open-field behavior was assessed 1, 2, and 3 weeks after intravenous injection of prelabeled human cord blood cells. Open-field test scores of spinal cord injured rats treated with human cord blood at 5 days were significantly improved as compared to scores of rats similarly injured but treated at day 1 as well as the otherwise untreated injured group. The results suggest that cord blood stem cells are beneficial in reversing the behavioral effects of spinal cord injury, even when infused 5 days after injury. Human cord blood-derived cells were observed in injured areas, but not in noninjured areas, of rat spinal cords, and were never seen in corresponding areas of spinal cord of noninjured animals. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that cord blood-derived stem cells migrate to and participate in the healing of neurological defects caused by traumatic assault.

Zhao ZM, Li HJ, Liu HY, Lu SH, Yang RC, Zhang QJ and Han ZC (2004). Intraspinal transplantation of CD34+ human umbilical cord blood cells after spinal cord hemisection injury improves functional recovery in adult rats. Cell Transplant. 13: 113-22. National Research Center for Stem Cell Engineering & Technology, State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People's Republic of China. The present study was designed to compare the functional outcome of the intraspinal transplantation of CD34+ human umbilical cord blood (CB) cells with that of human bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells in adult rats with spinal cord injury. Sixty adult Wistar rats were subjected to left spinal cord hemisection, and then divided into three groups randomly. The control group received an injection of PBS without cells, while the two other groups of rats received a transplantation of 5 x 10(5) CD34+ CB or BMS cells, respectively. Functional outcome was measured using the modified Tarlov score at days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after transplantation. A statistically significant improvement in functional outcome and survival rate in the experimental groups of rats was observed compared with the control group. Rats that received CD34+ CB cells achieved a better improvement in functional score than those that received BMS cells at days 7 and 14 after transplantation. Histological evaluation revealed that bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled CD34+ CB and BMS cells survived and migrated into the injured area. Some of these cells expressed glial fibriliary acidic protein (GFAP) or neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN). Our data demonstrate for the first time that intraspinal transplantation of human CD34+ CB cells provides benefit in function recovery after spinal cord hemisection in rats and suggest that CD34+ CB cells may be an excellent choice of cells as routine starting material of allogenic and autologous transplantations for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

Ende N, Chen R. Parkinson's disease mice and human umbilical cord blood. J Med. 2002;33(1-4):173-80. In 1995, it was suggested that immature stem cells (Berashis Cells) existing in human cord blood might have an ameliorating effect on such neurological diseases as Alzheimer's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. Since these predictions, we have been able to successfully extend the length of life of mice with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [B6SJL-TgN(SOD1-G93A)IGUR], Huntington's Disease (B6CBA-TgN(H.Dexon1)62Gpb and Alzheimer's mice [Tg(HuAPP695.SWE)2576]. Recently we expanded the studies to include mice with Parkinson's Disease. 32 mice, 6-12 weeks old B6CBACa-AW-J/A-Kcnj6 were obtained from Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine. The mice were divided into 3 groups: (A) 10 untreated control mice, (B) 10 mice treated with 5.6 x 10(6) congenic bone marrow mononuclear cells and (C) 12 mice receiving 100-110 x 10(6) HUCB mononuclear cells intravenously. No immunosuppression was used. When 50% of the controls were dead only 1 of the 10 mice receiving congenic marrow and 2 out of 12 mice that received cord blood mononuclear cells were dead. This preliminary study was terminated when the animal's were 200 days old, at that time one out of 10 controls was alive. Out of 10 mice that received congenic bone marrow, 2 were alive. Out of 12 mice that received megadoses of cord blood mononuclear cells 4 were alive. Survival curve of mice that had congenic marrow had a p value of <.05; the survival curve of mice receiving cord blood mononuclear cells had a p value <.001 (Fig 1) compared to controls. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells significantly delayed the onset of symptoms and death of Parkinson's disease mice. This effect was greater than that produced by congenic bone marrow cells.

Ende N, Chen R, Ende-Harris D. Human umbilical cord blood cells ameliorate Alzheimer's disease in transgenic mice. J Med. 2001;32(3-4):241-7. Having had success in extending the life of mice with a transgene for amyotropic lateral sclerosis (SOD1) mice and Huntington's disease (Hdexon1), we administered megadoses of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells to mice with Alzheimer's disease. These mice have an over-expression of human Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP), die early and develop a CNS disorder that includes neophobia. When given 110 x 10(6) human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells, these mice (HuAPP 695.SWE) had considerable extension of life with a p value of 0.001 when compared to control animals.

Ende N, Chen R. Human umbilical cord blood cells ameliorate Huntington's disease in transgenic mice. J Med. 2001;32(3-4):231-40. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells given in megadose quantity (71-74 x 10(6) and 100-105 x 10(6)) were able to increase the life span of B6CBA-TgN(Hdexon1)62Gpb mice (Huntington disease) from an average of 88 days to 97.8 and 103.4 days respectively. The rate of weight loss, which begins in these mice before the onset of symptoms of chorea, was far less in the animals receiving human cord blood mononuclear cells (p<0.01)>NOD/LtJ type I diabetes in mice and the effect of stem cells (Berashis) derived from human umbilical cord blood. J Med. 2002;33(1-4):181-7. Previously we have successfully delayed the onset of vasculitis and death in MRL Lpr/Lpr mice that are considered to have an autoimmune disease similar to human lupus erythematosus. Likewise, with the use of megadose human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells, we were able to delay the onset of symptoms and death in SOD1 mice that carry a transgene for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, considered by some to be an autoimune disease. A similar approach was utilized with NOD/LtJ type 1 diabetic mice. By administering megadoses of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells we were able to ameliorate the disease and improved the life span. This occurred to a greater extent than with bone marrow obtained from congenic mice. No immunosuppression was utilized in this study. This study raises the possibility of utilizing human cord blood mononuclear cells in conjunction with pancreatic islet transplantation.Ende N, Chen R, Ende-Harris D. Human umbilical cord blood cells ameliorate Alzheimer's disease in transgenic mice J Med. 2001;32(3-4):241-7. Having had success in extending the life of mice with a transgene for amyotropic lateral sclerosis (SOD1) mice and Huntington's disease (Hdexon1), we administered megadoses of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells to mice with Alzheimer's disease. These mice have an over-expression of human Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP), die early and develop a CNS disorder that includes neophobia. When given 110 x 10(6) human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells, these mice (HuAPP 695.SWE) had considerable extension of life with a p value of 0.001 when compared to control animals.

Cord Blood for ALS: the Petiton

FDA's Cord Blood for ALS Suppression: a History
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Letters of Anger and Hope
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FDA Says "No!" to Congressional Request

29 Comments:

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November 27, 2005 at 5:11 PM

 
Blogger hplauze said...

I have been on-line searching for hours for information regarding cord blood company and stumbled across your blog during my journey :-) James Kelly your blog is really amazing! Keep up the great work. Obviously my search on cord blood company was way off when compared to Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential and find it funny how it landed me here. The internet is a funny thing. Anyways, great job on your blogging and keep up the good work! I been searching for cord blood company for over 2 hours and needed a break from it. I started reading your blog and really started getting into it.
P.S I will add you to my favorites so I can come back and visit later
P.S.S If you want to bookmark my site I am at cord blood company . You never know you may find some good deals!

November 28, 2005 at 6:20 AM

 
Blogger cmeltifa said...

Well I just got back from the gym and I am beat. I am currently doing some research on stem cell from umbilical cord blood and stumbled across your blog. Which cracks me up really. The internet can certainly land you off base sometimes. Even though Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential is not completely related I think it is a cool blog. I have read back through the archives and lots of people make some very good points. Well I have been on-line forever it seems. I need to continue to plug away at stem cell from umbilical cord blood . If you have the energy swing by stem cell from umbilical cord blood . I try to update my site weekly and maybe you will see something you like. I already snagged your URL and put it in my favorites. If you do not mind I will be back again. Great job!

November 29, 2005 at 5:33 AM

 
Blogger Derek said...

Hi James Kelly your blog is really great! Wow :-) As I was out blog surfing and surfing the web for detailed info on saving umbilical cord blood I stumbled across your blog. Obviously my search landed me here and it is a little off subject compared to Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential, but I am certainly glad I did come across your blog. Did I already tell you I like it! If you would not mind, I would like to add your link to my "favorites" page to come back and read again sometime. Should you ever need it, there's lots of information on this site about saving umbilical cord blood . Again, great blog and keep up the great work!

November 29, 2005 at 6:32 PM

 
Blogger Rachel said...

Well I just got back from the gym and I am beat. I am currently doing some research on saving umbilical cord blood and stumbled across your blog. Which cracks me up really. The internet can certainly land you off base sometimes. Even though Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential is not completely related I think it is a cool blog. I have read back through the archives and lots of people make some very good points. Well I have been on-line forever it seems. I need to continue to plug away at saving umbilical cord blood . If you have the energy swing by saving umbilical cord blood . I try to update my site weekly and maybe you will see something you like. I already snagged your URL and put it in my favorites. If you do not mind I will be back again. Great job!

November 30, 2005 at 7:27 PM

 
Blogger Rebek said...

What up James Kelly! I just finished up a ten hour work day and decided to kick back and do some surfing. So I grabbed myself a drink and stumbled across your blog while doing some research on cord blood stem cell bank for a upcoming project I am doing. Well even though Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential isn’t what I was looking for I really enjoyed reading your blog. Your doing a great job and please keep up the good work. Lots of people do not keep their blogs up to date :0) There are some very interesting view points stated here. Anyways I am going to grab the bull by the horns and continue to plug away at cord blood stem cell bank. I have already bookmarked your blog. You many want to visit me at cord blood stem cell bank. You never know you might see something you like! Again great job

December 1, 2005 at 6:03 AM

 
Blogger Rebek said...

I have been on-line searching for hours for information regarding umbilical cord blood preservation and stumbled across your blog during my journey :-) James Kelly your blog is really amazing! Keep up the great work. Obviously my search on umbilical cord blood preservation was way off when compared to Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential and find it funny how it landed me here. The internet is a funny thing. Anyways, great job on your blogging and keep up the good work! I been searching for umbilical cord blood preservation for over 2 hours and needed a break from it. I started reading your blog and really started getting into it.
P.S I will add you to my favorites so I can come back and visit later
P.S.S If you want to bookmark my site I am at umbilical cord blood preservation . You never know you may find some good deals!

December 1, 2005 at 9:37 PM

 
Blogger hplauze said...

Sad to say I just got back from a bowling tournament and decided to log in and do some websurfing. James Kelly I love your blog. I had some very good laughs. I am doing a paper on saving umbilical cord blood and have been downloading information for the last hour. I don’t know how I came across Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential but I am glad I did. It has set me back a little because I have spent the last hour reading your archives. If you don’t mind I would like to add you to my favorites so I can back again and read some more. Well I need to get back to saving umbilical cord blood . I am almost finished with it. Great job.
p.s some very good points on your blog

December 2, 2005 at 6:23 AM

 
Blogger Rebek said...

Sad to say I just got back from a bowling tournament and decided to log in and do some websurfing. James Kelly I love your blog. I had some very good laughs. I am doing a paper on cord blood family trusts and have been downloading information for the last hour. I don’t know how I came across Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential but I am glad I did. It has set me back a little because I have spent the last hour reading your archives. If you don’t mind I would like to add you to my favorites so I can back again and read some more. Well I need to get back to cord blood family trusts. I am almost finished with it. Great job.
p.s some very good points on your blog

December 2, 2005 at 9:25 PM

 
Blogger hplauze said...

Sad to say I just got back from a bowling tournament and decided to log in and do some websurfing. James Kelly I love your blog. I had some very good laughs. I am doing a paper on cord blood family trusts and have been downloading information for the last hour. I don’t know how I came across Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential but I am glad I did. It has set me back a little because I have spent the last hour reading your archives. If you don’t mind I would like to add you to my favorites so I can back again and read some more. Well I need to get back to cord blood family trusts. I am almost finished with it. Great job.
p.s some very good points on your blog

December 6, 2005 at 7:37 AM

 
Blogger Rachel said...

Well this blog certainly is not about collection of umbilical cord blood. What the heck! I guess the internet can play some tricks on us sometimes. I have been on-line for two hours
researching collection of umbilical cord blood and came tumbling across your blog. I LOVE IT! I needed a break from collection of umbilical cord blood anyways :-) If you don't mind I want to add your
blog to my favorites list so I can come back later on and read some more stuff. Well I guess I should get back to researching collection of umbilical cord blood.
Even though my search is not on Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential I am glad I came across your blog. Keep blogging away!

December 6, 2005 at 10:20 PM

 
Blogger hplauze said...

I have been on-line searching for hours for information regarding cord blood registry cbrs and stumbled across your blog during my journey :-) Blogger your blog is really amazing! Keep up the great work. Obviously my search on cord blood registry cbrs was way off when compared to Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential and find it funny how it landed me here. The internet is a funny thing. Anyways, great job on your blogging and keep up the good work! I been searching for cord blood registry cbrs for over 2 hours and needed a break from it. I started reading your blog and really started getting into it.
P.S I will add you to my favorites so I can come back and visit later
P.S.S If you want to bookmark my site I am at cord blood registry cbrs. You never know you may find some good deals!

December 7, 2005 at 7:28 AM

 
Blogger Derek said...

Sad to say I just got back from a bowling tournament and decided to log in and do some websurfing. James Kelly I love your blog. I had some very good laughs. I am doing a paper on cord blood spinal supply and have been downloading information for the last hour. I don’t know how I came across Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential but I am glad I did. It has set me back a little because I have spent the last hour reading your archives. If you don’t mind I would like to add you to my favorites so I can back again and read some more. Well I need to get back to cord blood spinal supply. I am almost finished with it. Great job.
p.s some very good points on your blog

December 11, 2005 at 3:44 PM

 
Blogger Derek said...

Hey James Kelly. Very nice blog :0) I just got inside from washing and waxing my truck. It is my baby. Took me 2 hours though. So I settled down into my basement and started doing some web surfing. Anyways I am in the process of grabbing my masters degree and have spent the last 6 months researching cord blood stem cell banks. In the midst of my surfing I landed smack dab in the middle of your blog. I hope you do not think I am intruding but I must say it is great blog. Even though Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential is way off base from cord blood stem cell banks I found myself cruising through your blog archives for the last half hour :0) You have some nice blogging friends. Anyways, I need to get back to my mission. I wrote don’t your url and feel free to visit me here at cord blood stem cell banks. I am so busy so I can only update my site monthly. Keep up the great work

December 13, 2005 at 6:05 AM

 
Blogger cmeltifa said...

Well I just got back from the gym and I am beat. I am currently doing some research on cord blood storing and stumbled across your blog. Which cracks me up really. The internet can certainly land you off base sometimes. Even though Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential is not completely related I think it is a cool blog. I have read back through the archives and lots of people make some very good points. Well I have been on-line forever it seems. I need to continue to plug away at cord blood storing . If you have the energy swing by cord blood storing . I try to update my site weekly and maybe you will see something you like. I already snagged your URL and put it in my favorites. If you do not mind I will be back again. Great job!

December 14, 2005 at 6:24 AM

 
Blogger cmeltifa said...

What up James Kelly! I just finished up a ten hour work day and decided to kick back and do some surfing. So I grabbed myself a drink and stumbled across your blog while doing some research on cord blood spinal supply for a upcoming project I am doing. Well even though Cord Blood's Immediate Therapeutic & Research Potential isn’t what I was looking for I really enjoyed reading your blog. Your doing a great job and please keep up the good work. Lots of people do not keep their blogs up to date :0) There are some very interesting view points stated here. Anyways I am going to grab the bull by the horns and continue to plug away at cord blood spinal supply. I have already bookmarked your blog. You many want to visit me at cord blood spinal supply. You never know you might see something you like! Again great job

December 15, 2005 at 6:21 AM

 
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February 8, 2006 at 4:00 PM

 
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October 3, 2006 at 3:35 PM

 

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